About2019-04-23T05:34:33+00:00

About Blyth & Bathe

Experience and Approach

Your business will thrive with self-sustaining programs. We have the tools to help you develop autonomous strategies tailored to working in the North. A vast network of friends and associates support our work here, allowing us to better serve you, while strengthening our collective connection to this remarkable place.
Through our we have trained people in almost every community in the NWT. Our consulting efforts include land-use planning, online training, socio-economic development workshops, SWAT economic development assessment, archaeology, species-at-risk status reports, client advice on outdoor education interpretation, and support for ships travelling the Northwest Passage.

The Team

  • Project planning and advice
  • Stakeholder relations and negotiations
  • Research and policy

Fort Simpson

Bio

Over his thirty-year career with Parks Canada, Chuck held a wide variety of roles and responsibilities across the country, including Data Manager for the National Parks in the NWT, Resource Management Secretariat Manager for the National Parks in the NWT, Resource Management Planner Western Regional Office for Parks Canada, Superintendent and Chief of Resource Conservation for Nahanni National Park Reserve, National Warden Service Manager for Parks Canada Ottawa, and Manager of the National Parks Research Centre at the University of Alberta. Chuck has authored several pieces on a range of wildlife topics, including ungulate population dynamics, wildlife production systems in Western Canada, aspen parkland paleoecology, vegetation and ungulate management reports for Elk Island National Park, and Resource Management Programs and Research for Nahanni National Park.

As a principle of Blyth & Bathe for the last decade, Chuck has instructed Canadian Firearms Safety Training Course, negotiated impact benefits agreements, taught courses on the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act at the Thebacha Campus of Aurora College, hosted economic workshops, written SWAT analyses, contributed to status assessments of species at risk, and written protected areas assessment reports for the Government of the Northwest Territories.

Contact

Brands Served

    Environmental and natural resource consultation and advice
    Environmental assessment and natural resource management related training
    Firearms safety training

Education

  • Bachelor of Science in Plant Biology at the University of Calgary
  • Master of Science in Agriculture Food and Nutrition at the University of Alberta
  • Multidisciplinary Consultant (anthropology, environmental and safety educator, guide)

Fort Smith

Bio

John grew up in national parks across the Northwest Territories and developed a lasting love of wild spaces and the people who live in them. His passion led him to study archaeology and anthropology, and he has spent the last decade living and working in the NWT as a multidisciplinary consultant in environmental science, anthropology, education, and wilderness safety. Notably, John has been involved in the Species Status Report for Barren-Ground Caribou in the NWT: Traditional and Community Knowledge Component, the 2014 Government of the Northwest Territories Wildfire Report Card, and the Enbridge Renewal study for Liidlii Kue First Nation, among other projects.

Contact

Brands Served

    Government of the Northwest Territories
    Tlicho Government
    Adventure Canada

  • Multidisciplinary Consultant (anthropology, environmental and safety educator, natural resource management and sustainability)

Fort Smith

Bio

After graduating with a B.A. in Anthropology, Adam worked on numerous projects related to natural and cultural resource management throughout Western Canada. With Blyth & Bathe, he has garnered a wealth of experience delivering community-based environmental monitor training across the NWT and an extensive background in TK consulting work. A recent highlight for him was co-authoring the Species Status Report for Barren-Ground Caribou in the NWT: Traditional and Community Knowledge Component, for which he spent a month paddling the Thelon River.

Adam is wrapping up his MSc in Natural Resources Management, during which he has gained experience in establishing monitoring programs, developed a GIS-based analysis of habitat disturbances, and blended publicly available TK data with his scientific work. He is currently working with a number of communities to develop Guardians of the Land programs and is the technical writer for the Advisory Committee for Cooperation on Wildlife Management.

Contact

Brands Served

    1. Ɂehdzo Got’ı̨nę Gots’ę́ Nákedı – Sahtú Renewable Resources Board
    2. Aurora College
    3. Adventure Canada

Education

  • MSc. Natural Resource Management University of Iceland (pending)
  • BA. Anthropology University of Calgary.

Case Study

Guardians Training

Adam Bathe | 2019-03-26 05:46:56 | 0 Comments

We delivered a custom guardians training course for the Dehcho K’éhodi program.

See more case studies

FAQ

A. It was 1967. Colour TV had been invented a few years before, but most people watched it in black and white.

A. If you need a course and it’s not listed here, not to worry. We can help connect you with a teacher or create custom courses in almost anything relating to environment or cultural resource management or the outdoors.

A. We provide clients with reports, text, or edits. Often we are not the authors, but are included in the credits. If you need a report written, we can help.

A. We offer the two safety courses you need: the CFSC (non-restricted licence only) and the CRFSC (restricted licence). Once you have completed this training, you can apply for your firearms Possession and Acquisition License (PAL).

A. We provide clients with reports, text, or edits. Often we are not the authors, but are included in the credits. If you need a report written, we can help.

A. Yes. This area covers 160,000 acres in the southern end of the Mackenzie Mountains of Canada. It lies almost 885 kilometres due west of Fort Simpson on the Mackenzie River. Hot springs and sulphur geysers keep the valley warmer than the surrounding areas by about 30 degrees year-round (the valley is above 60 degrees latitude), making it perpetually mist-covered. Only animals inhabit the valley, as people who have entered are usually found headless and quite dead.